Infrastructure firm releases data on potential jobs created by proposed pipeline

01.10.2012


An infrastructure firm released a statement on January 10 containing data on how its highly-visible pipeline project would trigger both manufacturing staffing and construction staffing.
An infrastructure firm released a statement on January 10 containing data on how its highly-visible pipeline project would trigger both manufacturing staffing and construction staffing.

An infrastructure firm released a statement on January 10 containing data on how its highly-visible pipeline project would trigger both manufacturing staffing and construction staffing.

The statement indicates that the project, which would transport oil from Alberta, Canada, to various locations in the United States, would create 20,000 jobs - 13,000 of those being in construction and 7,000 being in manufacturing. Jobs would also be created by the materials that would be needed for the project.

The project would require materials and related services that would cost hundreds of millions - items such as steel pipe, creation of piping assemblies and structural steel that would be used for supports, hundreds of valves, thousands of fittings, motors that would be used for running pumps, meters that would measure the amount of oil transported, and electrical and cabling equipment needed to help create the infrastructure of pipeline monitoring systems. The infrastructure firm is currently working with more than 50 suppliers nationwide.

The jobs would be created as follows: 500 workers would be needed for every one of the 17 segments of the 1,600 mile pipeline. In total, this employment need of the project would create 8,500 jobs. The six construction camps that would be created would require 100 workers each. Building the pipeline project would also entail 30 pump stations that would necessitate 100 employees apiece. Between the camps and the pumps, another 3,600 workers would be needed. Also, the project would require 1,000 workers for supervision and inspection. That would bring the total to 13,000 jobs.

"These are new, real U.S. jobs. Thirteen thousand Americans would be put to work constructing our [project]," Russ Girling, president and chief executive officer of the infrastructure firm, said in the statement. "Seven thousand more jobs would be created in the U.S. manufacturing sector, making the materials needed to build" the project.

The statement said that "hundreds of jobs will be created through requirements for fuel, coating materials, welding supplies, concrete materials, geo-textile materials, pipeline weights, native seed materials for reclamation, cathodic protection materials, crushed rock, sediment barrier materials, valve and pigging assemblies, field trailer manufacturing, construction mats, power facility materials, aggregate manufacturing, road construction materials, water and waste facility manufacturing, fencing materials, communication infrastructure, bridge construction materials and many others."

All these needs could serve to spur both manufacturing staffing and construction staffing.