Job-seeking veterans should prepare early and use available resources

08.06.2013


Job-seeking veterans should prepare early and use available resources
Military service supplies veterans with a wide array of skills, and preparation and presentation can help their chances when trying to find a job.

While the unemployment rate appears to be slowly falling across the nation, the number of veterans without jobs after returning from service still remains higher than overall national rates. Military service supplies veterans with a wide set of skills, and preparation and presentation can help their chances when trying to find a job.

Preparing for the job search well before transitioning out of active service should be a premier focus for veterans, according to Military.com, as the application process can take time. It doesn't have to be intricate and detailed, but a basic game plan of what to do first will help drastically.

In addition, obtaining further education, whether a bachelor's degree, a vocational degree or a certificate program, will arm you with tools that can help to ease the transition back into the civilian workforce.

Though it may not seem like it, military service provides a wide assortment of skills easily translatable into a civilian work setting. By researching your experience and finding relatable civilian jobs, it should be simple to update your resume with plenty of abilities highly desired by employers.

Military veterans also have a large collection of networking resources at their disposal. Between job references from higher-ups, job search websites and services tailored specifically for those with military experience and the millions of veterans already employed in today's marketplace, it can be easy to connect with the right people, getting you that much closer to a great position.

If you'd rather have someone else looking to place you in a job, contacting a staffing agency may be the best way to go. They can assist you in translating your skills to a civilian setting and help your search reach its full potential, as their first priority is getting you employed, and can land you in a great position doing what you're interested in.

Determining what your passion is can be an important tool when it comes to employment, as many hiring managers want their applicants to have a certain directive when applying for jobs. Thinking introspectively, discovering what aspects of work you've enjoyed and would want to continue doing in the future, is an important part of finding your passion, according to Denver's 9News. Finding a job after life in the military can be jarring, but preparing well can help you rise to the challenge .

Job Search