Recruiting emphasis should be on the right person for the company

05.20.2014


Recruiting emphasis should be on the right person for the company
Recruiting emphasis should be on the right person, not the best person

In many companies' staffing processes, most hiring officials focus on concrete evidence when they're looking at candidates for a job. This means that they take everything into account that implies skill, such as school performance, work performance and past successes in the industry. But this approach is often not as successful as many would expect, as there are many intangibles in the hiring process.

Communities Digital News reported that it's important to make sure that the employee in question has the right attitude and work ethic for the position, but it goes further than that. With a high-end skill set, it's likely for an employee to become antsy in a short period of time. In this light, it's just as important to find an engaged and excited person as much as it is to find someone with a strong background.

As such, you shouldn't make any rash decisions before the interview process. Getting to meet the individual can give you a better idea of how their personality meshes with the company's goals. There are a few ways you can better determine these measures, though. One is to be consistent throughout the hiring process. Asking the same questions in the same way to different people will give each respondent their own opportunity to make their own case. Consistent information from each candidate will help you determine which employees stand out the most.

Cultural fit is key

The news source notes that these answers will give you a major indication of whether an applicant is right for the job. Asking them about how they can handle tough situations and quizzing them on how they'd act in industry-related dilemmas will give a big clue as to their readiness to take on and represent your company. It will also show their dedication, as unprepared applicants will make themselves known quickly. Whether they didn't think to do their research or didn't care to look up the current direction of the industry, this will improve your long-term approach to the overall hiring dilemma.

Knowledge expressed during such a question will actually be a great indicator of a quality hire, according to Forbes. While you'll be disappointed by candidates who may not know their stuff, an applicant who can go above and beyond in their answers will likely be willing and ready to get into the industry. Being able to describe and understand expectations for the immediate future of the company is one clue that you've found the right person for the position.

Be proactive for better quality recruits

Forbes added that some recruiting approaches can remove the pains of waiting for the right employee, instead bringing them right to your doorstep. This can be done by enhancing the hiring department's efforts via social media or online advertising. This adds a personal approach to how outside candidates will perceive your recruiting department, which will likely increase the chances that they send in their resumes. Avoiding keyword filters in monitoring application collection will also help you find better employees. It may mean more work, but you may find a high-quality candidate who would have otherwise slipped through the cracks.

The news source also noted that many creative industries may especially suffer from traditional application processes. Creative people have the potential to be eccentric, which can come across as problematic in the rigid and structured interview process. Don't make assumptions about your interviewees, especially not early in an interview. You may find yourself turning down someone who will be perfect for the job.

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